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A local service which helps military veterans experiencing mental health problems features in a new book looking at what happens when soldiers return from the frontline of combat to try and re-engage with civilian life.

Aftershock: The Untold Story of Surviving Peace by Matthew Green includes interviews with former combatants and serving personnel as well as their families, physicians, therapists and psychiatrists.

One chapter deals with the experiences of military nurse Hilary Horton who served in Iraq. Due to the extremely traumatic experiences during her military service, Hilary developed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). She was referred to South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (SSSFT) at St George’s Hospital, Stafford, where Consultant Counselling Psychologist Shirley Timson assessed her and treated her using Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a treatment which uses flashing lights to stimulate the brain to help people to process traumatic memories.

Two people at a local drug and alcohol team have been recognised for the outstanding contribution they have made to the effective and patient centred care delivered by Inclusion, an NHS service providing drug, alcohol and psychological services.

Unsung Hero
Julie Whitfield
Julie Whitfield won the award for Unsung Hero. Julie is a recovery worker based in Wisbech where she works with clients involved in the criminal justice system. She consistently goes above and beyond the call of duty to provide excellent care to a demanding client group and does so with enthusiasm and vigour.

Support Worker of the Year
Andy Burley
Andy Burley won the award for Support Worker of the Year. Andy is the sole prison in-reach engagement worker for the criminal justice team in Inclusion Cambridgeshire. He works tirelessly to give service users a voice and to bridge the gap between prison and community services as they are released.

The Drug and Alcohol Recovery Team (DART) from Her Majesty’s Prison, Isle of Wight have been recognised for the outstanding contribution they have made to effective and patient centred care.

The DART won a Clinical Team of the Year Award for providing clinical and psychosocial interventions to a challenging and complex client group. Their service has also been described as gold standard following a recent prison inspection.

The judges commented “We were very impressed by the achievements of this team whose members are clearly very talented and dedicated and provide a great service”

The service is provided by South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust which specialises in care in prisons and which also provides mental health, learning disability and specialist children’s services.

The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Transformation Team have been recognised for the outstanding contribution they have made to the effective and patient centred care delivered by South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust.

The CAMHS Transformation Team won a Partnership Award for having a shared vision to transform mental health services for children and young people. The team work in partnership with commissioners, the voluntary sector and young people to seek out creative and innovative solutions that make a real difference to care.

The judges commented “The team demonstrated a creative approach to sharing resources across agencies, and ensuring children and young people were fully involved in service redesign.”

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